"You have to be burning with ‘an idea, or a problem, or a wrong that you want to right.’ If you’re not passionate enough from the start, you’ll never stick it out."

— Steve Jobs (via creativesomething)

"How do creative geniuses come up with great ideas? They work and edit and rewrite and retry and pull out their genius through sheer force of will and perseverance. They earn the chance to be lucky because they keep showing up."

— Via How creative geniuses come up with great ideas (via creativesomething)

The Wild Ponies of Shackleford Banks, NC

By: Lauran Holton | June 2014 | iPhone 5

hitrecord:

“Tree of Owls”
"Human beings are works in progress that mistakenly think they’re finished."

— Dan Gilbert, The psychology of your future self (via ted)

Cape Lookout, NC ~ 2014, iPhone5
rev1211media

smartgirlsattheparty:

A great reminder for all you Smarties!

smartgirlsattheparty:

A great reminder for all you Smarties!

(Source: thlnkdifferent)

punc:

awkwardsituationist:

from girl rising …to consider on international women’s day (and every day thereafter)

equality needs to be a goal that everybody actively works towards.

(via upworthy)

ourtimeorg:

And this is why Amy Poehler is the best.

ourtimeorg:

And this is why Amy Poehler is the best.

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

smartgirlsattheparty:

Happy Birthday to Maya Angelou! 

smartgirlsattheparty:

Happy Birthday to Maya Angelou! 

Don’t Push Yourself Off the Cliff…you have co-workers for that
Every Sunday, my favorite deli is packed. Every Sunday, I order my food “for here” and worry that I will not have a place to sit and eat the food. I visualize myself telling the guy behind the counter that he has to change my order “to go.” And every Sunday, by the time my food is ready, I have a place to sit.
Imagine how my brain processes actual problems. No, don’t—I wish this on no one.
Worry is that negative conversation on loop in your mind. The one with all the things your should have said in the meeting or your mental assessment of what everyone must have thought while you were talking. It’s the shouting match you have with the mirror of all the things you wish you could say to that one co-worker. Worry tells you that nothing will change. You will always get the bad end of the deal, and the worse-case scenario will invariably happen. 
Worry absolutely stinks. It is self-inflicted torture. Worry is the act of throwing yourself off the cliff—no one pushing you, no one else to blame. Worry is “crazy you” vs. “moderately sane you” fighting at the brink of imaginary despair.
As a table opened at the deli, my ridiculous mental dialog stopped. Then I realized that I do the same thing in too many areas of my life. What if I had done “xyz” differently? Will I ever win the bid, get the job, earn a bonus, create something awesome, pioneer a new strategy? Worry always answers “no,” makes you feel trapped then validates you desire to play the role of helpless victim in your own story. 
Who is writing your story? You or that voice in your head?
Worry is a state of mind. Action, goals, and hard work are real. My dad always says, “Don’t worry, your gifts (talents/abilities) will always make a place for you.” He is right. Just when you think there will be no other jobs, no more good projects, no new prospects—a table opens.

Don’t Push Yourself Off the Cliff…you have co-workers for that

Every Sunday, my favorite deli is packed. Every Sunday, I order my food “for here” and worry that I will not have a place to sit and eat the food. I visualize myself telling the guy behind the counter that he has to change my order “to go.” And every Sunday, by the time my food is ready, I have a place to sit.

Imagine how my brain processes actual problems. No, don’t—I wish this on no one.

Worry is that negative conversation on loop in your mind. The one with all the things your should have said in the meeting or your mental assessment of what everyone must have thought while you were talking. It’s the shouting match you have with the mirror of all the things you wish you could say to that one co-worker. Worry tells you that nothing will change. You will always get the bad end of the deal, and the worse-case scenario will invariably happen. 

Worry absolutely stinks. It is self-inflicted torture. Worry is the act of throwing yourself off the cliff—no one pushing you, no one else to blame. Worry is “crazy you” vs. “moderately sane you” fighting at the brink of imaginary despair.

As a table opened at the deli, my ridiculous mental dialog stopped. Then I realized that I do the same thing in too many areas of my life. What if I had done “xyz” differently? Will I ever win the bid, get the job, earn a bonus, create something awesome, pioneer a new strategy? Worry always answers “no,” makes you feel trapped then validates you desire to play the role of helpless victim in your own story. 

Who is writing your story? You or that voice in your head?

Worry is a state of mind. Action, goals, and hard work are real. My dad always says, “Don’t worry, your gifts (talents/abilities) will always make a place for you.” He is right. Just when you think there will be no other jobs, no more good projects, no new prospects—a table opens.

"Fame is a four-letter word; and like ‘tape’ or ‘zoom’ or ‘face’ or ‘pain’ or ‘life’ or ‘love’, what ultimately matters is what we do with it.

I feel that those of us in television are chosen to be servants. It doesn’t matter what our particular job, we are chosen to help meet the deeper needs of those who watch and listen—day and night!

The conductor of the orchestra at the Hollywood Bowl grew up in a family that had little interest in music, but he often tells people he found his early inspiration from the fine musicians on television.

Last month a thirteen-year-old boy abducted an eight-year-old girl; and when people asked him why, he said he learned about it on TV. ‘Something different to try,’ he said. ‘Life’s cheap; what does it matter?’

Well, life isn’t cheap. It’s the greatest mystery of any millennium, and television needs to do all it can to broadcast that … to show and tell what the good in life is all about.

But how do we make goodness attractive? By doing whatever we can do to bring courage to those whose lives move near our own—by treating our ‘neighbor’ at least as well as we treat ourselves and allowing that to inform everything that we produce.” ~ Mister Rogers

tedx:

tedx:

Happy Galentine’s Day! 5 talks to help you celebrate the ladies in your life:
Tomorrow is Valentine’s Day, the day we all love to love (or) hate, where we get to smother our loved ones with praise, adoration, and heart-shaped chocolates.
But today, today is Galentine’s Day, the day created by the fictitious Leslie Knope of the television show Parks and Recreation for women to honor the women in their life.

“What’s Galentine’s Day? Oh, it’s only the best day of the year. Every February 13th, my lady friends and I leave our husbands and our boyfriends at home, and we just come and kick it, breakfast-style. Ladies celebrate ladies.”—Leslie Knope


Here at TEDx we’re no strangers to the myriad of contributions smart, savvy, and super awesome women  are contributing to the modern world, and we’ve got some talks to prove it.
So, in honor of Galentine’s Day, and hard-working, butt-kicking ladies everywhere, 5 TEDx Talks that Leslie Knope would be proud of:

Shabana Basij-Rasikh: Dare to educate Afghan girlsIn this talk at TEDxWomen 2012, Shabana Basij-Rasikh discusses how she and her sister risked their lives by going to a secret school after the Taliban outlawed school for girls in Afghanistan. Hers is a talk that will make you feel privileged to even have a chance to watch classmates throw spitballs in geometry class. A must-watch for anyone — male or female — who’s ever not wanted to get up and go to school.

Soap saves: Renée Botta at TEDxDUChangeRenée Botta works in improving sanitation measures in slums in Nairobi. When she learned of a woman in a neighboring slum making homemade soap, she thought the process would be a good way for community members to get involved in improving local sanitation — until she met Helen — a single mother who decided to not only make this special soap herself, but also to sell it, as a way to become financially independent and take her health, her family’s, and her community’s into her own hands.

A teen still just figuring it out: Tavi Gevinson at TEDxTeenIn this talk, 15-year-old Tavi Gevinson, the editor of Rookie magazine, discusses modern media’s portrayal of women, and her struggle to find portrayals of women that actually resemble real women she knows. When she looked at media representations of teen girls, she ran into the same dead ends, she says, so she decided to take matters into her own hands, and create a space where the content was not just aimed at teenage girls, but made by teenage girls as well.

I’m an astronaut … and a woman: Nicole Stott at TEDxSugarLandIn this inspiring talk from TEDxSugarLand, astronaut Nicole Stott tells her story of becoming an aeronautical engineer and going into space, drawing inspiration from the women who came before her. “I was usually the only girl in my [classes],” she says in her talk, “but I never really noticed it. I never noticed it unless somebody else pointed it out to me. And I think that’s because I was studying something I loved to do, and all the people around me were studying something they love to do as well.”

Why you fear math: Laura Overdeck at TEDxWestVillageWomenIn this talk, mathematician Laura Overdeck explains how adults reinforce the stereotype that boys are naturally better at math and science than girls. “If you give men and women a quiz with math,” she says, “and for some of them, at the beginning they’re asked to check off their gender … the women who have on their test [the question] asking them to check off their gender, do worse than the women who didn’t have that question. Just being reminded that you’re female makes you do worse on a math test.” She has ideas to change this — just watch.
Bonus: TEDWomen talks from Ms. Knope’s heroes, Madeleine Albright and Hillary Clinton:
Madeleine Albright: On being a woman and a diplomat
Hillary Clinton’s surprise TEDWomen talk on empowering women and girls
Photo via Salon.

We’re revisiting this playlist from last year, because it is once again Galentine’s Day, and like our friends at smartgirlsattheparty, we want to celebrate.

Happy Galentine’s Day!!!

tedx:

tedx:

Happy Galentine’s Day! 5 talks to help you celebrate the ladies in your life:

Tomorrow is Valentine’s Day, the day we all love to love (or) hate, where we get to smother our loved ones with praise, adoration, and heart-shaped chocolates.

But today, today is Galentine’s Day, the day created by the fictitious Leslie Knope of the television show Parks and Recreation for women to honor the women in their life.

“What’s Galentine’s Day? Oh, it’s only the best day of the year. Every February 13th, my lady friends and I leave our husbands and our boyfriends at home, and we just come and kick it, breakfast-style. Ladies celebrate ladies.”
—Leslie Knope

Here at TEDx we’re no strangers to the myriad of contributions smart, savvy, and super awesome women  are contributing to the modern world, and we’ve got some talks to prove it.

So, in honor of Galentine’s Day, and hard-working, butt-kicking ladies everywhere, 5 TEDx Talks that Leslie Knope would be proud of:


Shabana Basij-Rasikh: Dare to educate Afghan girls
In this talk at TEDxWomen 2012, Shabana Basij-Rasikh discusses how she and her sister risked their lives by going to a secret school after the Taliban outlawed school for girls in Afghanistan. Hers is a talk that will make you feel privileged to even have a chance to watch classmates throw spitballs in geometry class. A must-watch for anyone — male or female — who’s ever not wanted to get up and go to school.

Soap saves: Renée Botta at TEDxDUChange
Renée Botta works in improving sanitation measures in slums in Nairobi. When she learned of a woman in a neighboring slum making homemade soap, she thought the process would be a good way for community members to get involved in improving local sanitation — until she met Helen — a single mother who decided to not only make this special soap herself, but also to sell it, as a way to become financially independent and take her health, her family’s, and her community’s into her own hands.

A teen still just figuring it out: Tavi Gevinson at TEDxTeen
In this talk, 15-year-old Tavi Gevinson, the editor of Rookie magazine, discusses modern media’s portrayal of women, and her struggle to find portrayals of women that actually resemble real women she knows. When she looked at media representations of teen girls, she ran into the same dead ends, she says, so she decided to take matters into her own hands, and create a space where the content was not just aimed at teenage girls, but made by teenage girls as well.


I’m an astronaut … and a woman: Nicole Stott at TEDxSugarLand
In this inspiring talk from TEDxSugarLand, astronaut Nicole Stott tells her story of becoming an aeronautical engineer and going into space, drawing inspiration from the women who came before her. “I was usually the only girl in my [classes],” she says in her talk, “but I never really noticed it. I never noticed it unless somebody else pointed it out to me. And I think that’s because I was studying something I loved to do, and all the people around me were studying something they love to do as well.”

Why you fear math: Laura Overdeck at TEDxWestVillageWomen
In this talk, mathematician Laura Overdeck explains how adults reinforce the stereotype that boys are naturally better at math and science than girls. “If you give men and women a quiz with math,” she says, “and for some of them, at the beginning they’re asked to check off their gender … the women who have on their test [the question] asking them to check off their gender, do worse than the women who didn’t have that question. Just being reminded that you’re female makes you do worse on a math test.” She has ideas to change this — just watch.

Bonus: TEDWomen talks from Ms. Knope’s heroes, Madeleine Albright and Hillary Clinton:

Photo via Salon.

We’re revisiting this playlist from last year, because it is once again Galentine’s Day, and like our friends at smartgirlsattheparty, we want to celebrate.

Happy Galentine’s Day!!!

bloodwatermission:

"Intense love does not measure, it just gives." Mother Teresa

bloodwatermission:

"Intense love does not measure, it just gives." Mother Teresa